Archives for posts with tag: The Internet

What happened to human decency? There was a time when decorum played a vital role in our society. We thought before we spoke, and we actually considered the consequences of our words and actions.  Many blame the disappearance of valor on the advent of the Internet. But is the Internet the cause of society’s visceral conduct or is it simply a conduit? I am more inclined to lean towards the latter. There are many factors that are contributing to the implosion of our humanity, but today, we’ll focus on the Internet.

Here is a thought to ponder: The Fall of Man began with Adam and Eve’s decision to eat from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil.  Well, today, we could say that it seems as if history is repeating itself.  Our vehement pursuit of information has taken us into uncharted territory.

The Internet is laden with all sorts of information–some good; some bad.  However, the sheer presence of information does not always equate to knowledge.  Information is simply raw data.  Knowledge and wisdom is the prudent application of information and the distillation between fact, fiction and opinion.

One of the greatest reasons why the Internet serves a great conduit for the breakdown of decency is because it is anchored by anonymity.  Even when sites are hosted by well known companies, we never really know who sits behind the screen.  Almost every company and every individual has an Internet persona/alias. Social media platforms and website comment sections allow us to hide behind our usernames and spew our opinions under our veiled protection.

Like with anything else, anonymity, when used appropriately, could be beneficial. Whistleblowers and tipsters use anonymity to defend the truth and expose wrong doing. Not everyone is brave enough to oppose evil face-to-face, and that is okay.  In a functional society, we need these types of system in place to maintain order.  Anonymity has also been used to advance and prosper others.  For example, many well-intentioned, good people have made anonyomous donations and gestures for benevolent purposes.  While there are some benefits of anonymity, if we are not careful, it could be dangerous.

Anonymity = the state of being anonymous (secret, nameless, featureless, unidentifiable)

Loosely defined, anonymity is hiding or covering the truth (or a lie).

When something is covered, it is veiled. It is in a darkened state.  Darkness, by definition is the absence of light. Light is representative of truth, goodness and purity.  However, with anonymity, there is a temptation to stray from truth and honesty, which appeal to our primal affinity for darkness. The Internet’s inherent anonymity could potentially satiate our basic appetites for wickedness and cruelty.  Moreover, recent online cultures enable us to be reckless with our careless words because there is little accountability for those who hide behind the armour of user/screen names. In a rather paradoxical way, the anonymity provided by the Internet perpetuates self aggrandizement at the expense of common courtesy and decency. In fact, it’s easy to dehumanize others for shares and likes when we don’t have to look them in the eyes, or face any consequences. In today’s society the old adage, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words may never hurt me,” has never been further from the truth. Words are weighty and consequential. The power of life and death is in our words (the tongue).  Hopes, dreams, aspirations, failure, fatigue and suicides have all been triggered or ignited by words.

So what do we do? The truth is there is no easy, singular answer to yield a resuscitation of decency. However, a good start is individual accountability. Each person has to be responsible for his or her words and actions. While we might not be able to change anyone else, we can definitely change ourselves.

Advertisements

screenshot_20170708-220749.jpg

Lately, I’ve found that the first thing I do after waking up and the last thing I do before going to bed is to read the news.  It’s actually gotten pretty depressing.  The typical news story portrays the world as one that has gone to hell in a hand basket.  Stories of savagery and inhumanity are ubiquitous.  Murder, rape, and pillaging are some of the most common headlines.  The sensationalism is beyond the categorical scope of yellow journalism.  The story contents are vile and the commentaries are even more viscous.  This morning, as I attempted to scroll the Internet for my daily dose of news happenings, a small, still voice told me to stop.

 

Proverbs 4:23 says, “Guard your heart above all else, for it determines the course of your life,” (NLT).  In this visual age, our world has become inundated by sensory images, and unfortunately, most of the tactics have been subliminal.  Everything and everyone is vying for our attention.  We have to be cognizant of the information that we filter through our eyes, our hearts and our minds because what we allow to resonate in those places often shape our emotions and our actions.  While it is important that we keep abreast of current events, it is critical that we filter out the hysteria and the nonsense.  The seeds that we water will be the one that will take life and grow.  If we plant seeds of negativity and despair, then our days and our lives will be filled with doubt and turmoil.  If we plant seed of hope, then our lives will be fruitful and productive.  So, during these days of fake news, political turmoil, and civil unrest, let’s take heart that goodness still exists.  God still sits on the throne.  He is the same yesterday, today and forever (Hebrews 13:8).  The promises that God made yesteryear are still relevant today.  Filter out the negativity and embrace the promises.

The Internet has revolutionized the world by allowing, for the most part, a free exchange of thoughts and ideas.  Information on the Web is instantaneous.  Long gone are the days when news took days, weeks or even years, to travel from one side of the world to the other.  Social media has also influenced our culture by encouraging the liberty of free speech.  However, the impact of social media has not always been positive. Oftentimes, it allows ill-spirited people to spew hatred from behind the protective shield of a computer screen and from behind the anonymity of a screenname.

A few weeks ago, I was thinking about King David.  In fact, I’m always thinking about King David.  He’s one of my favorite people in the Bible.  I love his naked transparency.  He was perfectly imperfect, if such a thing exists.  God loved him too, so much so that the Bible labeled him the apple of God’s eyes.  The stories of David teach us that even though God loves us and always forgives us, there are times when He holds us accountable for our actions.  In 1 Chronicles 21, David sinned against God.  He did something that God instructed him not to do.  As a result, God held him accountable.

God was very displeased with the census, and he punished Israel for it. Then David said to God, “I have sinned greatly by taking this census. Please forgive my guilt for doing this foolish thing.” Then the Lord spoke to Gad, David’s seer. This was the message: 10 “Go and say to David, ‘This is what the Lord says: I will give you three choices. Choose one of these punishments, and I will inflict it on you.’” 11 So Gad came to David and said, “These are the choices the Lord has given you. 12 You may choose three years of famine, three months of destruction by the sword of your enemies, or three days of severe plague as the angel of the Lord brings devastation throughout the land of Israel. Decide what answer I should give the Lord who sent me.” 13 “I’m in a desperate situation!” David replied to Gad. “But let me fall into the hands of the Lord, for his mercy is very great. Do not let me fall into human hands,” (1 Chronicles 21:7-21).

David’s response to God’s three choices has been something that I have held on to in my life.  David said that he would rather fall into the hands of God that into the hands of men.  Oh, how true!  As I read many of the pop culture news stories, I often ask myself the question, “How long should we be made to pay for our past mistakes?”  God said that we are new creatures in Christ, (2 Corinthians 5:17).  So often, people want to define us by our past.  So often, people want us to carry the scarlet letter of sin to the grave.  They want us to walk with our heads hung low for things we have done in our past.  I would rather fall into the hands of God than into the hands of man.  God makes all things new (Revelation 21:5).  Just as any good parent would, there are times when God does punish us for our sins.  However, the punishment is finite.  There IS an end.

The Lord is compassionate and merciful, slow to get angry and filled with unfailing love. He will not constantly accuse us,  nor remain angry forever. 10 He does not punish us for all our sins; he does not deal harshly with us, as we deserve. 11 For his unfailing love toward those who fear him is as great as the height of the heavens above the earth. 12 He has removed our sins as far from us as the east is from the west. (Psalms 103: 8-12, NLT).

The heart of men tends to incline toward eternal condemnation.  Thank God, there is freedom in Christ Jesus.  We are not defined by our past.  We are not who we were.  Christ allows us the freedom to reinvent ourselves yearly, monthly, daily and even secondly.  In one minute, we could be the devil reincarnate and in the other, we could be ambassadors for Christ.  This is the freedom found in the blood of Christ.  Man does not define us.  They cannot.  Man cannot define what he did not create.

As we lean into God today, I want to remind you that you are not who you were yesterday.  During the next few weeks of this challenge, consider taking a break from social media.  Unfortunately, today, so much of who we think we are is tied up in other people’s opinions and validation, or lack thereof.  We need to reset our standards.  Over the next few weeks, learn who God says you are.  Learn who He created you to be.  Remember, when God created man, He created him in His own image.  When He was finished, He said, “This is good,” (Genesis 1:27-31).  God did not say, “Wow, this is bad.  Back to the drawing board.”  He said, “This is good!”  Therefore, He intended for us to see ourselves as such.  We are His masterpiece, (Ephesians 2:10).

Today’s prayer:  Lord, remind us who we are.  Never allow us to fall into the hands of man.  Lord, we know that when you punish us, your judgment is swift and fair.  Lord, allow us to learn who we are in you.  Remind us that Christ has made all things new.  In Jesus’ name we pray.  Amen!