Archives for posts with tag: Greed

Historically, there has always been a subset of the population who has considered money to be a god.  However, in more recent times, society has experienced the progression of money from demigod to supreme being.  In the infamous words of Wu-Tang Clan, “Cash rules everything around me.” Or does it?

 

In today’s culture, money seems to be the ultimate common denominator.  In many cases, it is the pivotal driving force for decision making.  Most people consult their money before they consult their God, family or friends.  Money motivates us.  It drives us.  It seduces us.  The truth is, there is nothing inherently wrong with money.  Money is the world’s currency.  Our capitalistic society is based on commerce, which is ultimately an exchange of goods and money.   The problem occurs when we place the value of money above all else.

 

In the new rat-race normal, big business has become the new big brother.  Its presence is ubiquitous, and its reach extends far beyond the bottom line to the bottom of our wallets.  The concept of enough is unquantifiable and insatiable.  It’s not enough for everyone to have his or her own piece of the pie.  Somehow, many in our society have subscribed to the misguided notion that we all cannot win.  Just look at the level of greed on Wall Street.  Economic goals are moving targets.  The cry for more has become a daily anthem.  The almighty dollar has become the alpha and the omega for many.

Navigating the course of the economic labyrinth is exhausting.  Oftentimes, financial resolutions often boil down to a battle of stamina.  Many company policies are intentionally designed to fatigue the consumer.  The hamster wheel approach to problem resolution frustrates most people into financial surrender.  Fortunately, money is not a God.  God is God, and He still sits on the throne.

“Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal,” (Matthew 6:19, KJV).  If we allow money to become our gods, then what recourse do we have when our money fails us? Money will fail us.  It’s not a matter of if.  It’s a matter of when.

Last year, I read a story about a Chinese man, who five years prior, had buried his entire life’s savings.  About a year ago, when he and his family dug up the buried money, they discovered that insects had eaten through most of the man’s cash.  Fortunately, the local bank was able to exchange the salvageable bills, which accounted for approximately half of his savings.  Although this man’s story had some what of a happy ending, what about those who weren’t so fortunate?  What about those who have lost all of their financial wealth and have nothing else to turn to?  What do they do?

Jesus was not oblivious to the value of money in the world’s economic structure (Matthew 17:24-27).  He acknowledged that there was some value to subscribing to the laws of the land.  However, he also asserted that monetary gain should not be the foundation on which we stand.  Wealth and fortune are fleeting.  Life should be built on more stable foundations.  There are things in this life that money cannot buy.  Money cannot buy happiness, freedom, respect or love.  In fact, money is often the cause of strife.  If we rest our hope and dreams on wealth, we will always face chronic disappointment.

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Greed

The name of this blog is called That Next Level Thinking.  Part of the reason why I decided to write this blog is because I believe that in order to separate ourselves from the pack, we have to learn to think outside the box—to think on that next level.  In a spiritual context, that means leading with our spiritual minds and seeing past the vision of our natural eyes.  Today, I am starting a new series called the “Seven Deadly Sins.”  Hopefully, over the next seven days, I will challenge you to think outside the box as we look at these seven vices and discuss how they impact our Christian walk.

The theory of the seven deadly sins has captured the interest of scholars, historians, philosophers, artists and even movie directors for centuries.  In 1995, the American movie, Se7en, told the story of two police detectives who tracked a serial killer who profiled his victims based on the seven sins: wrath, gluttony, sloth, greed, pride, envy and lust.

Although the concept of the seven deadly sins is not Biblical per se, some scholars have said that the principle has a Biblical derivative, specifically Proverbs 6: 16-19 and Galatians 5:19-21:

16 There are six things the Lord hates,
seven that are detestable to him:
17  haughty eyes,
a lying tongue,
hands that shed innocent blood,
18   a heart that devises wicked schemes,
feet that are quick to rush into evil,
19     a false witness who pours out lies
and a person who stirs up conflict in the community, (Proverbs 6:16-19, NIV).

19 The acts of the flesh are obvious: sexual immorality, impurity and debauchery; 20 idolatry and witchcraft; hatred, discord, jealousy, fits of rage, selfish ambition, dissensions, factions 21 and envy; drunkenness, orgies, and the like. I warn you, as I did before, that those who live like this will not inherit the kingdom of God (Galatians 5:19:21).

TODAY’S DEADLY SIN: GREED

What is greed?  Greed is an insatiable appetite for possessions.  In other words, it’s a bottomless desire for more “stuff.” Usually, that “stuff” is material in nature.   According to 1 John 2:16, “For everything in the world–the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life–comes not from the Father but from the world,” (NIV).

As I was thinking about the topic of greed this week, the parable that came to mind was “Jesus and the Prince of Demons.”  In the parable, Jesus cast out a demon from a possessed man.  As usual, the Pharisees tried to entrap him.  They accused him of being in allegiance with the prince of darkness.  Jesus responded to them saying:

19 And if I am empowered by Satan, what about your own exorcists? They cast out demons, too, so they will condemn you for what you have said. 20 But if I am casting out demons by the power of God, then the Kingdom of God has arrived among you. 21 For when a strong man like Satan is fully armed and guards his palace, his possessions are safe— 22 until someone even stronger attacks and overpowers him, strips him of his weapons, and carries off his belongings, (Luke 11:19-22, NLT).

I am sure many of you are not quite seeing the greed connection.  Just bear with me.

If greed is from the devil, then it stands to reason that the devil himself is greedy.  He IS the father of greed.  We should also keep in mind that the devil is a spiritual being, hence, the things that the devil craves are not “natural”.  In other words, the devil is not enticed by designer labels and premium neighborhood.  He craves spiritual possessions.  He has an insatiable appetite for our souls.  He’s greedy.  This brings me back to the passage: “For when a strong man like Satan is fully armed and guards his palace, his possessions are safe,” (NLT).

Satan tries to gather us like possessions.  One of the possible reasons why many of us have not experienced our breakthrough is that we haven’t realized that there are principalities that are trying to resist us.  Ephesians 6:12 says we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities.  Our battles are spiritual.

Now, I feel like I need to interject for a second.  We should understand that we are never outside of God’s reach.  Some of us are exactly where God wants us to be.  Just like Jesus, the Spirit drove us into the wilderness.  Others of us, on the other hand, have created our own wilderness experience.  The good news is that even when we detour off course, God can use our mistakes for our edification and for His Glory.  However, regardless of which situation we find ourselves in, we have to acknowledge that there is a spiritual battle taking place.  The “strong man” is always trying to vie for ALL our souls (greed).  Verse 21 says that “when a strong man like Satan is fully armed and guards his palace, his possessions are safe,” (NLT).  Thankfully, there is a caveat to that statement.  The following sentence in that verse says that Satan’s possessions are safe with him “until someone even stronger attacks and overpowers him, strips him of his weapons, and carries off his belongings,” (NLT).  We should know that even though we have an enemy, we also have an ally who is far stronger and will rescue us from the devil’s wiles.

Today, if there are any of you facing difficulties or praying for breakthroughs, ask God to tie up the “strong man” so that you could walk out of his house and into your destiny with ALL of your “possessions.”  In Jesus’ name.  Amen!

Photo Credit: Peterheck.com (No endorsement of content.  Just loved the graphic:-) )