Archives for posts with tag: Fatigue

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A few weeks ago, I took a trip to California, which for the past few years, has been my default happy place.  I was a bit underwhelmed during my recent travels.  The effects of the drought were ubiquitous, and in an instant, my fond memories of the once picturesque landscape were deflated.  As I navigated around the city, I couldn’t help but notice how California’s fertile grasslands now appeared dry and barren.  However, that wasn’t entirely true.  Speckled throughout the desolate terrain were pockets of life—areas of new growth—hope.  As I drove along the multicolored mountain sides, I began to remember what the City used to look like.

During our walk as Christians, we often go through dry seasons—seasons of drought.  Just like the California drought, there are so many lessons to be learned during those periods.  The first, if not the most important lesson, is despite our circumstances, there is always a glimmer of hope.  As long as we have life in our bodies, there is hope.

The second lesson that our dry season teaches us is to pay attention to those who are around during our drought.  Are there people, who were once in our courtyard, who have since faded into the background?  Are the remaining people in our lives watering our garden or depleting our soil?

As I continued to marvel at the California desert, I started to notice how readily discernable the weeds were from the vegetation.  They were now more prominent and readily visible.  I believe the same is true of our walk in life.  God uses our drought to extract our “weeds.”  During our seasons of prosperity, it can be difficult to discern between our foes and our friends, because our enemies, just like the weeds, are also capable of infiltration and camouflage.  It is important that during our drought we identify and uproot the weeds in our garden.  If not, the dry season will come to an end, and we will be left with the same infestation that plagued us during our feast.

Many of us view our dry season as God’s punishment, but if we look at if more carefully, it’s an opportunity—a chance to start afresh.  It’s a chance to take off all that entangles and run our race uninhibited.

If you are going through a dry season in your life, take note of the weeds.  Uproot them.  Do not turn back.  God is about to turn it around, and He wants you to be free to enjoy the feast-the end of the drought!

One of my favorite books growing up was “Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret,” by Judy Bloom. I love the sentiment of the title. It’s a question that we have all asked God.

Today, we ask: Are you there God? It’s me, (insert your name). In our fallen world it’s easy to question God’s whereabouts. There are so many social and political issues that overwhelm the news. It’s easy to wonder if God cares about His World–If He cares about you. Why is God so seemingly quite?  Are you there God? It’s me! That seems to be the cry of a generation.

One of the Scriptures that God laid on my heart a few days ago was John 29:20. “…blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed.” Many of the daily occurrences in our fallen world serve to challenge our belief in God’s existence.  Sometimes, if we look through the lenses of our natural eyes, we might be inclined to question whether or not God cares about His people. We might even ask ourselves, “Why should God care about us? We are just mere men.” Fortunately, the Bible reminds us that God does care about His creation.  Psalms 8:4-6 says:

 4 What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him? For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour. 6thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet, (KJV).

God cares so much about the intimate details of our lives that He even knows the number of hairs on our heads.

Our finite knowledge cannot begin to explain the things of God. I don’t know why God sometimes appears silent when we need Him the most. I don’t really know whether He is, silent, that is. Maybe we miss His voice that sometimes comes in a whisper. The nature of these questions are too complex for me. However, I do know this. Gideon asked for a sign of God’s favor, and he got it. David asked for protection, and his enemies fled. The woman with the issue of blood needed health and was healed when she touched the hem of Jesus’ clothing. What do you need? Shout it from the rooftop. Scream His name! Petition His promises! Jesus, Jesus, Jesus! Are you there? It’s me!

Today’s Prayer: Lord, we come to you with hearts surrendered. Are you there? It’s me. Lord, hear our heart’s cry. Lord, show us your unrelenting love. Give us a sign like you did for Gideon. Today, we ask that you show us a sign of your awe and might. Lord, grant us protection as you did for David. Make our enemies our footstools. Heal our bodies like you did for the woman with the issue of blood. Lord, we thank you, and we bless you. In Jesus’ name. Amen!

Are you in the middle of a storm?  Are you at a point where no matter how much you try, things just seem to go wrong?  If so, keep reading! The next few sentences might change your perspective.

Ephesians 6:12 says, “For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places,” (KJV).  Oftentimes, we think that we are battling people and situations.  We are not.  We are fighting against spiritual wickedness.  Our spirits are in constant combat with an enemy whose mission is to kill, steal and destroy (John 10:10).  In fact, this enemy is constantly on the prowl looking for vulnerability—someone to devour (1 Peter 5:8).  The Bible says that “we live in a body of flesh. But we do not fight like people of the world,” (2 Corinthians 10:3, NLV).  Make no mistake, we are frequently at war.  This constant battle fatigues our mind, body and spirit.  The enemy’s desire is to tire and to prevent us from accomplishing God’s goals and desires in and for our lives.  He is also not above impersonation, “For even Satan disguises himself as an angel of light,” (2 Corinthians 11:14, ESV).  He also enlists the spirits of doubt, insecurity, failure, fear and other vices to attempt to triumph over us—to fatigue us into defeat.

I once heard that the best defense is a great offense.  When it comes to spiritual warfare, the first step to achieving victory is realizing that we are in a spiritual warfare.  We must know that if we attempt to go into this war unarmed, we will lose.  We are not equipped with the skills or the strength to combat the prince of darkness.  If we attempt to do so, we will die—at least spiritually—or maybe even physically.  In order to avoid the schemes of the devil, we must put on the full armor of God (Ephesians 6:11).  The battle is not our, but God’s (2Chronicles 20:15).  “The weapons we fight with are not the weapons of the world. On the contrary, they have divine power to demolish strongholds,” (2 Corinthians 10:4).  In Psalm 91, the Bible says that God will send his angels to protect us.  Our only defense against the enemy is GOD!

There are three major take home messages of spiritual warfare:

  1. Know that we have an enemy
  2. Know that he will attack us.
  3. Know that we MUST arm ourselves with the armor of God.

Lord, today, we pray the following bold prayer in Jesus’ name.

Lord,

In Jesus’ name, we bind the enemy and his attacks.  We also loose all that he has stolen from us.  The word says whatever we bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever we loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven (Matthew 18:18).  Lord, we ask your angels encamp around us.  Guard our comings and our goings.  Fight our battles.  Cut down every enemy in our way.  Give us victory in situations where you have called us to be victorious.  Lord, I pray that you fight for your people.  Protect us from our enemies.  Your word says, touch not your anointed and do your prophet no harm (Psalm 105:15).  Lord, anoint us.  Grant us eternal favor dear Lord.  In Jesus’ name.  Amen!