Archives for posts with tag: Courageous

I have a question for all you Sunday School buffs.  What was the sin that got Adam and Eve kicked out of the Garden of Eden?  Now that the Jeopardy music has stopped playing, what is your final answer.   Ding! Ding! Ding!  If you said, “Eating from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil,” you won the grand prize.

This afternoon, I was in the middle of writing and entirely different blog when God struck me with the following profound revelation.

  1. Our quest for knowledge is great, as long as it doesn’t come at the price of faith.
    1. The story of Adam and Eve is so complex, and it has so many spiritual implications and interpretations, but here is what God laid on my heart today. In the Garden of Eden, God gave Adam dominion over the land.  The entire land was his to explore.  However, Adam was not satisfied in gradually exploring the kingdom.  He wanted instant gratification—instant knowledge.  Learning the lay of the land would take too long.  Eating from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil would give him an instant upload of information.  Isn’t that true of you and I.  Rather than simply letting each day play out and taking life day by day, we attempt to skip to the last chapter of our lives, hoping to get a sneak preview.  How many of us have been given Gardens to explore, but continue to fall because of our multiple attempt to eat from our individual Trees of Knowledge of Good and Evil?
  1. Knowledge if left unchecked could become an adversary of faith.
    1. If we knew everything, why on Earth would we need God? There comes a point in our pursuit of knowledge where we have to curb our enthusiasm.  As most scientists know, the deeper we delve into knowledge, the more we realize just how much we do not know—just how inexplicable the universe is.   In fact, many scientists have gone mad trying to find answers for things for which there are no known explanation.  At some point, science will take us to a terminal end—an “x-factor”—an unknown.
  1. If knew everything, then we would become God’s equal. When we equate ourselves with God, we automatically become prideful.
    1. Who would have thought that just wanting to know whether God is going to move in our live could lead to pride? It can, and it does if we are not careful.  Here is why:

Lack of Faith =                                          Doubting God

Doubting God =                                         Doing life by our own will (no need for God)

Doing Life by our own will =                       Pride

Pride =                                                       Lack of Faith.

When we lack faith, what we are essentially saying is that there is no need for God—we are our own God.

The good new is, God is faithful when we are not.  He knows that our hearts are adulterous, yet He loves us nonetheless.  Ephesians 2:8 states that, “God saved you by his grace when you believed. And you can’t take credit for this; it is a gift from God,” (NLT).  I believe that God gives us revelation, not to condemn us, but to allow us to live a life full of His grace.  If nothing else, our revelations remind us that there is no way that we could ever live up to any standard of perfection.  We are only made righteous through the blood of Jesus Christ.  I hope this this post blessed you.  Be blessed until we meet again.

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It’s that time of year. It’s time for a mid-year check in.

Have you ever noticed how easy it is to get amped up about the future on New Year’s Eve? At the beginning of the year, we feel as if anything is possible. We fill our journals with plans, resolutions and declarations. Unfortunately, somewhere around March, we start to lose fizzle. Our dreams and aspirations start to wane. That is why I think that it’s important to do a mid-year assessment—a mid-year check in. Look back at those New Year’s resolutions. Where are you now in comparison to where you said that you wanted to be? Revisiting your New Year’s goals will help to realign your focus and keeps your dreams and visions omnipresent.

Yesterday, I scanned the pages of my journal and was reminded of the declarations that I made at the beginning of the year. Few were complete.   Some were in process, and an even greater number was not even started. Truthfully, I had even forgotten about some of them. I had a few “oh yeah” moment when I read through some of my goals. What about you? What were your New Year’s resolutions? What things did you want to accomplish? Please know that it’s not too late to pick up where you left off in pursuit of your goals. Dust yourself off and start over. If you have been trudging along, keep plowing.   James 1:12 says, “Blessed is the one who perseveres under trial because, having stood the test, that person will receive the crown of life that the Lord has promised to those who love him,”(NIV). There is also encouragement found in Galatians 6:9, which says that “Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up,” (NIV).   The key here is: Do not give up. Revive those dreams. Dust off those goal, and keep it moving!

O Lord, hear me as I pray; pay attention to my groaning. Listen to my cry for help, my King and my God, for I pray to no one but you. Listen to my voice in the morning, Lord. Each morning I bring my requests to you and wait expectantly, (Psalm 5:1-3, NLT).

Day 21—We made it. Wow! What a journey this past three weeks has been. In the beginning of the challenge, I told you that one of the primary reasons why I started this challenge was in response to story about a pastor who after a yearlong journey of “living without God” decided that He was now an atheist. I wanted to challenge myself and my readers to see what life looked when we actively pursued God. So what did we learn?

The first thing that we probably discovered was that life is not easy. In Matthew 16:24-26, Jesus told His disciples, “’Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 25 For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me will find it. 26 What good will it be for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul? Or what can anyone give in exchange for their soul,’” (NIV).

The Message translation puts it this way:

“’Anyone who intends to come with me has to let me lead. You’re not in the driver’s seat; I am. Don’t run from suffering; embrace it. Follow me and I’ll show you how. Self-help is no help at all. Self-sacrifice is the way, my way, to finding yourself, your true self. What kind of deal is it to get everything you want but lose yourself? What could you ever trade your soul for?’”

The moment that we decided to embark on this challenge, the devil got busy. There were obstacles and roadblocks that attempted to make our journey difficult. However, here is what I learned. Greater is He who is in us, than he who is in the world, (1 John 4:4). In John 16:33, Jesus said, “Here on earth you will have many trials and sorrows. But take heart, because I have overcome the world,” (NLT).

The name of Jesus is greater than any other name in this world, (Philippians 2:9). The name of Jesus is greater than death, Satan, sickness, sadness, fear, debt, worry, loneness, anger, and the list goes on and on.

As I officially close this 21-day challenge, I issue this lifetime challenge. Embrace the verses in Psalm 5:1-3:

O Lord, hear me as I pray; pay attention to my groaning. Listen to my cry for help, my King and my God, for I pray to no one but you. Listen to my voice in the morning, Lord. Each morning I bring my requests to you and wait expectantly, (Psalm 5:1-3, NLT).

Know that God is not deaf to our prayers. Psalm 6:9 says “The Lord has heard my plea; the Lord will answer my prayer,” (NLT). The verse does not says that God might answer our prayers. It said that He WILL answer our prayers. Today, know that as we wait patiently on God’s answers to manifest, the answer is already waiting in the wings.

Lord, more than 2000 years ago, you sent your one and only son, Jesus Christ, to die for all our transgressions. Lord, we thank you. We thank you for your mercy and your deliverance. On Jesus’ final moments on the cross He spoke the final words that confirmed our destiny on Earth and in Heaven. Jesus’ final words were: It is finished! Lord, thank you that everything that has ever been promised to us has already been delivered since before the beginning of time. Lord, we thank you that IT IS FINISHED!

As we move into Day 11, one of the greatest piece of advice I have is, “Just say no!”

Not every good thing is worth doing. While an activity or a deed might be inherently good, it doesn’t mean that we have to do it. We have to prioritize our time and make sure that we are spending it appropriately. One of the reasons that I believe that many of us are not further along on our path is because we keep getting distracted by peripheral events. Sometimes, we just have to say “no.”

We cannot spend our lives being people pleaser. There is only one of us, and there is only a finite amount of activities that we can do in a given day. At some point, saying yes to one thing means saying no to another. It is important that we take stock and evaluate to whom and to what we say yes and no to. Before I move on, I have to say this. In love and friendship, there will be times where we have to deny ourselves to help others. If we have never sacrificed ourselves (e.g. our time, our support, our money, etc.) for some else’s benefit, then we are selfish and probably not a good friend. Sorry. It’s true! With that being said, we have to weigh the amount of times we say no to ourselves against the amount of time we say yes to others. If we are constantly saying no to ourselves by constantly appeasing others, that is a gross imbalance. At that point, we have to re-shift our priorities. People who love us will understand when we occasionally say no. If they don’t, that is their problem and not ours.

In order to be where God needs us to be and not stretch ourselves too thin, we have to determine what is important. Even in the church, I see people stretching themselves thin because someone guilted them into a ministry that God never assigned them to. While serving in Sunday School and singing on the choir are all good things, it might not be the right thing for everyone. We don’t have to pursue every good thing. That’s why there are billions of people on the Earth. Each person is called to do something specific. For our happiness, wellness, and sanity, we have to learn to say no.

Today’s Prayer: Father, give us discernment regarding the things that we spend our time on. Give us the courage to say no to the things that waste our time or the things that are sent to distract us from our assignments. Also, give us the courage and the strength to pursue the things that you have laid on our hearts. In Jesus’ name we pray. Amen!

Guarded Heart

Today’s message is to guard your heart.

Proverbs 4:23 says, “Above all else, guard your heart, for everything you do flows from it,” (NIV). As we step into God’s presence over these next few days, I challenge you to guard your heart. According to dictionary.com, to guard means to keep safe from harm or danger. Therefore, to guard our hearts means to keep it safe from harm or danger.

Why on earth would we need to keep our hearts safe?

The devil comes to steal, kill and destroy, (John 10:10). The devil isn’t trying to destroy us per se. He is trying to destroy the thing that God loves most, which is us. To the devil, we are simply a causality of war. Fortunately, we serve a God that so values His creations that He ensures that we are always heavily guarded and heavily protected by the impenetrable forces of heaven’s army. The devil can never launch a secret attack while we are encamped on heaven’s base. The only way that the devil can attack us is by luring us from under God’s artillery.  The only way he can do so is by separating us from the word of God. Now, I feel the need to make this disclaimer. The Bible says that the rain falls on the just and the unjust alike (Matthew 5:45). We live in a fallen world, and bad things happen to good people and vice versa. The presence of atrocities in our lives is not always directly correlated with our deeds. I digress.

Again, I ask the question: Why should we guard our hearts? Simple! It’s where God hid His Word, and I could not think of a better hiding place.

33 “’But this is the new covenant I will make with the people of Israel after those days,’ says the Lord. ‘I will put my instructions deep within them, and I will write them on their hearts. I will be their God, and they will be my people,’” (Jeremiah 31:33, NLT).

Think about this. Ephesians 3:17 says, “Then Christ will make his home in your hearts as you trust in him. Your roots will grow down into God’s love and keep you strong,” (NLT). So, if God has written the word on our hearts, and Christ will make a home in our hearts if we let Him, then as long as we let Christ in, the Word is guarded, and it will begin to grow roots into our heart. Unfortunately, the devil is constantly trying to separate us from God by trying to steal and corrupt the Word in our hearts.

Guarding our hearts sometimes means not entertaining “debates” about religion. “Don’t answer the foolish arguments of fools, or you will become as foolish as they are,” (Proverbs 26:4, NLT). Entertaining misguided religious philosophies could corrupt our thinking, and subsequently derail our relationship with Christ. Before we began our walk with Christ, God met us where we were. Sometimes, we just have to allow God to meet others where they are. We don’t have to convict everyone. The same way God convicted us, He will convict others as well.

Proverbs 27:17 says, “As iron sharpens iron, so a friend sharpens a friend,” (NLT). As we progress towards our God-given destinies, it is important that we surround ourselves with people who bring out the best in us as they challenges us to grow. God has planted His seed in each of our hearts, and we have to be careful how we allow it to be stolen or how we give it away.   If there are relationships that are hindrances to our growth, we might need to sever them to best guard our hearts. “If your right hand causes you to stumble, cut it off and throw it away,” (Matthew 5:30, NIV). Sometimes, in our misguided attempt to help others, we end up repeating lessons that we should have already received!

Today’s Prayer: Lord, help us to guard our hearts as we focus on you. Soften our hearts so that the seeds that you have planted will always remain on fertile ground! Help us to love you, ourselves and your people as you have commanded. Keep us free from temptation. Help us to forgive other so that you can forgive us. In Jesus’ name we pray. Amen!

Shortly before Christ died, He made a promise. He promised that believers would be able to do the same or greater things than He had done.

12 Very truly I tell you, whoever believes in me will do the works I have been doing, and they will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father. 13 And I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son. 14 You may ask me for anything in my name, and I will do it, (John 14:12-14, NIV).

Wow, that’s quite some promise. Yet, when I look around, I wonder whether we are truly experiencing those greater things. Are we truly a faithless generation?

No, I think there are many who call themselves faithful in our generation. I just think the majority of our generation has a misguided sense of how faith works.

The Bibles says faith without works is dead, (James 2:17). Notice when Jesus healed the paralytic, He told him to pick up his mat and go home, (Mark 2:1-12). In our generation, many of us want God to bless us without having to work for it. My friend, the only free gift in the Kingdom is salvation (Ephesians 2:8-9). Everything else requires work.  Please don’t misunderstand and think that I am saying that we have to earn or work for God’s favor.  We don’t.  However, we have to work to maintain the blessings he gives us!  Think about it this way.  Imagine if someone gifted you with a brand new car–fully loaded and fully fueled–yet you never refueled or serviced it.  Would it continue to work?

I believe the reason why many of us have yet to experience the greater work that God mentioned in the Bible is because we have not yet learned to fully release and exercise our faith. The Word says, “The eyes of the Lord search the whole earth in order to strengthen those whose hearts are fully committed to him…”2 Chronicles 16:9. God is constantly looking for those whom He can trust with His vision. However, there is a cost. Jesus talks about that cost in Luke 9:57-62:

57 As they were walking along the road, a man said to him, “I will follow you wherever you go.”

58 Jesus replied, “Foxes have dens and birds have nests, but the Son of Man has no place to lay his head.”

59 He said to another man, “Follow me.”

But he replied, “Lord, first let me go and bury my father.”

60 Jesus said to him, “Let the dead bury their own dead, but you go and proclaim the kingdom of God.”

61 Still another said, “I will follow you, Lord; but first let me go back and say goodbye to my family.”

62 Jesus replied, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for service in the kingdom of God,” (NIV).

I believe many people miss the significance of the first verse due to its metaphoric nature. Jesus said. “Foxes have holes and birds have nest, yet the Son of Man does not have a place to lay His head.” There are two important principles in that verse. First, Jesus, the Son of Man, is looking for a place to lay his head. “Christ is also the head of the church, which is his body. He is the beginning, supreme over all who rise from the dead. So he is first in everything,” Colossians 1:18, (NLT). If you put these two verses together, it tells you that the Son of Man is looking for a place to lay His Church. Many of us are looking for the church behind four walls, but the Church begins in our hearts. Remember earlier, we said, “The eyes of the Lord search the whole earth in order to strengthen those whose hearts are fully committed to him…”2 Chronicles 16:9. Jesus is looking for a place to lay his head, the Church.

The second important point that I think many miss in the verse, “Foxes have holes and birds have nest, yet the Son of Man does not have a place to lay His head” is the reference to Jesus as the Son of Man. We just mentioned that God is looking for people with whom to trust His vision. In other words, God is looking for leaders. The mention of Jesus as the Son of Man is crucial. “For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve others and to give his life as a ransom for many,” Matthew 20:18, NLT.

In order to lead, we have to know how to serve. Many of us want to lead, but we don’t want to serve. Leadership sometimes requires that we roll up our proverbial sleeves and get our hands dirty.

The above verse could have easily referenced Jesus as the Son of God, yet it didn’t. Jesus knew who He was and walked in that authority. He didn’t have to hold his title over others in order to lead them.

So, what are these greater things that Christ talked about? The Bible was filled with recollections of the impossible and the miraculous. Jesus healed the lame, the leper and the blind. He multiplied a morsel and fed a village. He thought of ingenious ways of creating revenue—drachmas from the belly of a fish. Jesus promised that not only would we be doing these things, but we would be doing more amazing things. Now, that’s a promise! Today, I pray over the greater things in my generation.  I pray over the future curers of cancer, HIV, diabetes, paralysis and all other sicknesses. Today, I pray that people will be able to lay hands on each other and cure each other, including exorcising their “demons.” I pray that Christian entrepreneurs will launch their billion-dollar industries and advance the Kingdom. I pray that Christian marriages will be consummated and Christian families will be restored. I pray that in my life, and in the lives of those who believe, there will be greater things. In Jesus’ name, I pray! Amen!

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With liberty and justice for all…

Those are the words on which the United States’ Pledge of Allegiance rests. Unfortunately, the grand jury’s November 24, 2014 ruling on the Ferguson, Missouri shooting has once again exhumed a dirty, American secret—racism.

Racism in America is ubiquitous. It’s in our schools. It’s in our government. It’s in our homes, and it’s even in our churches. Yes, racism is even present in the house of God. For some, “liberty and justice for all” is conditional. For those individuals, the privilege of justice and equality is applied only to the subset of the population that looks and thinks like them.

I’m only three paragraphs into this blog, and I have probably already offended a great majority. When it comes to social faux pas, religion and politics are high on the list. However, I think that is part of the problem. Our nation has become so concerned with political correctness that we have diminished the free exchange of ideas and information and substituted it with a false sense of tolerance. A nation that is tolerant will always be a nation filled with prejudice, apathy, and hatred. You see, tolerance is not the same as acceptance or even love. To tolerate someone means that if given the change, you would rather not interact with them. You tolerate them because you have no choice. For a nation that rests on the principles of God, that is unacceptable!

This morning, as my fingers stroked across my keyboard, I wasn’t quite sure where I wanted to go with today’s blog. My heart ached as I read about a city stricken by grief and charged emotions. I mourned over a mother who has lost her child. As I tried to make sense of all this madness, I wondered, “Where is God in all of this?” The verse that immediately came to mind was, “For the eyes of the Lord range throughout the earth to strengthen those whose hearts are fully committed to him…” (2 Chronicles 16, 9).

Throughout the bible, God is constantly looking for at least one person who will make a difference in their generation. Before God destroyed the city of Sodom, he said to Abraham, “

“If I find fifty righteous people in the city of Sodom, I will spare the whole place for their sake.”

27 Then Abraham spoke up again: “Now that I have been so bold as to speak to the Lord, though I am nothing but dust and ashes, 28 what if the number of the righteous is five less than fifty? Will you destroy the whole city for lack of five people?”

“If I find forty-five there,” he said, “I will not destroy it.”

29 Once again he spoke to him, “What if only forty are found there?”

He said, “For the sake of forty, I will not do it.”

30 Then he said, “May the Lord not be angry, but let me speak. What if only thirty can be found there?”

He answered, “I will not do it if I find thirty there.”

31 Abraham said, “Now that I have been so bold as to speak to the Lord, what if only twenty can be found there?”

He said, “For the sake of twenty, I will not destroy it.”

32 Then he said, “May the Lord not be angry, but let me speak just once more. What if only ten can be found there?”

He answered, “For the sake of ten, I will not destroy it,” (Genesis 18: 26-32).

I believe that God is looking for someone, at least one person, in each generation that will stand up in His name. This means standing up in the face of injustice and inequality. It means speaking love into the hearts and the lives of God’s people.

With liberty and justice for all…

The original version of the Pledge of Allegiance was written in August 1892 by Francis Bellamy (1855–1931), a Baptist minister and a Christian Socialist. The original version read: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” Years later, Louis Albert Bowman ignited a movement to incorporate the phrase “one nation under God.” Now, I don’t know how that all transpired, nor do I know what political processes were in place for that to occur. The point I am trying to make is this: one person can make a difference. Many are called, but only few are chosen. Will you answer the call to be a voice of your generation? The world needs people who are unapologetically, unashamed to stand up for justice—to stand up for God.

The problem is that most people are waiting for someone else to make the sacrifices.  Most people are waiting for someone else to take a stand.  What if that person that everyone is wait on is you?  What will you do?

If you’ve followed my blog for some time, you’ve probably realized that I am a huge music fan. I love everything for classical music to soft rock. There are only a few genres of music to which my palate has not developed. Many of my thought are often accompanied by the soundtrack of songs in my head. Even the title of today’s blog made me think of the 1987 hit, Jealous Fellas, by Dimples Tee.

Earlier this morning, I came across an Instagram post stating that Christian rapper, Lecrae, was recently on Jimmy Fallon and that he was discussing the success of his new album, “Anomaly.” I was excited. Not only do I love Lecrae’s music, I am always proud to see Christians using their talent and their platform to advance the Kingdom of God. I hadn’t yet heard the album, so I decided to listen to the single, “Nuthin,” online. In a nutshell, the song highlighted what Lecrae believes to be a prevalent trend in the hip-hop culture—the inclination to romanticizes and glamorizes materialism and frivolity. I thought it was rather profound. As I was about to scroll to the next song, I caught a glimpse of one of the comments. It accused him of using illuminati and satanic symbols in the video. It’s also accused him of being a false Christians.

STOP IT!

John 8: 7 says, “…let the one who has never sinned throw the first stone!” I have no idea whether or not such symbols were implemented.  I don’t even know enough about illuminati, or the likes thereof, to render an opinion on the topic.  Moreover, that topic is beyond the scope of this discussion.

For some people, what I am about to say might come as a revelation. Here goes! We are ALL sinners!!!! Yes, every single one of us. It is not up to any of us to judge the depth of another person’s relationship with God. Remember Job. Both his family and his friends thought that his adversity was a result of his sins against God. They could not have been further from the truth. In fact, God favored Job, and after he stood the test of adversity, God rewarded him twofold. Here is my point. None of us knows what conversation(s) other people have with God. Maybe God has instructed someone to do something in a manner that is unconventional. To the naked eye it might seem preposterous. However, it might be their directive from the Lord. And even it if wasn’t, some things are just none of our business. Just as God allowed us to come into relationship with Him on our own terms. Sometimes, we have to allow others to come into relationship with God on their terms.  That is not to say that we cannot gently, and with love, correct our brothers and sisters.  When relating to each other, we have to constantly ensure that the pools of our memory are not shallow. It’s easy to forget where God has delivered us from, but, we have to. That’s what keeps us humble.

I have to say this. When you and I berate other people’s blessing and the use thereof, it comes across as jealousy. All too often, I have observed that the very same people who are critical of others have no problems enjoying the same blessings when it is bestowed upon them. As Christians, we must remember that the rain falls on the just and the unjust (Matthew 5:45), and every good and perfect thing is from God (James 1:17). The same God that blesses you is the same God that blesses the next person (unrighteous or righteous). My pastor once said this: “For most people, excess is usual one score above what they can afford.” If I can afford a Mercedes, then excess is having a Ferrari. That cannot be so. God blesses each of us in accordance to what He knows that we can handle. Unfortunately, not everyone is equipped to handle fame and fortune.  “If you are faithful in little things, you will be faithful in large ones. But if you are dishonest in little things, you won’t be honest with greater responsibilities,” (Luke 16:10).

One of the hardest things for us to do is to look in the mirror and “truly” assess the person staring back at us. Yet, in order for us to grow, it is something that we must do daily. If we are constantly finding fault with other people, we must ask ourselves: “What is wrong with me?”

“Most people hate in others what it is that they hate about themselves,” (Unknown). Know that if you are constantly finding fault with others, there is something wrong with your thinking. It is a reflection of how you feel about yourself. In order for you to love others, you have to first love yourself—truly love yourself—in private. You are God’s masterpiece, created anew in Jesus Christ (Ephesians 2:10). God loves you very much, but He also loves your brothers and sisters as well. Just as you want God to be tender and patient with you. Allow the same extension of grace to your fellow man. If you and I are to advance the Kingdom of God, there cannot be this constant squawking about who has done it right or who has done it best. We are all on a journey. Most of us are trying to do the best we can. All of us, at some point, WILL get it wrong. Give people a chance to err. Also give them a chance to recover. Sometimes, the best thing we can do as Christians is to extend grace.

N.B. I feel compelled to say this. For those people who have allowed the misdoings of Christians to be their excuse for not establishing a relationship with God, I caution you. Christians are imperfect people made alive by the extension of grace. Most Christians follow the Doctrine of Jesus Christ. Many of us attempt to get it right. None of us do. Only one person has every gotten it right all the time, and His name is Jesus. The reason that none of us will ever get it right all the time is because God wanted to make sure that none of us could ever boast that we are perfect. We are all flawed.

Please know that your relationship with Christ cannot hang on the hinges of imperfect people. The cost is too high. I encourage you to learn about God for yourself. If you are going to accept or reject him do so on your own accord, not someone else’s. In the body of Christ, fellowship is important, but it cannot usurp your personal relationship with Christ. Think about your personal relationships. I am sure there is at least one person (e.g. mother, father, sibling, spouse, grandparents, aunt or uncle) in your family that most people just do not get along with. However, you still love them. Why? Their relationship with you is independent of how others feel about them or interact with them. Shouldn’t you afford the same opportunity to God?

Day 22: The 30-Day Marriage Prayer Challenge:  Be strong and Courageous!

According to National Geographic, the ladybug’s distinctive spot and attractive colors are used to repel predators. As Christians, we too have a “predator repellant.” It’s called the blood of Jesus. God sacrificed His only Son that we could have life everlasting. Jesus’ crimson blood covers our entire being. As a result, we can go into the world, a predatory atmosphere, and not be afraid.

Joshua 1:9
Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the LORD your God will be with you wherever you go.”

Isaiah 1:18
Though your sins are like scarlet,
They shall be as white as snow;
Though they are red like crimson,
They shall be as wool.

Today’s prayer: Lord, Let us go into the world and be strong and courageous. Father, send your angels before us to fight the battles that we cannot fight.