Archives for category: Pride

Integrity—It’s who you are when no one is watching.  In today’s world, it can often appear as if honor is a forgotten virtue.

2 Timothy 3:1-5 says, “ Don’t be naive. There are difficult times ahead. As the end approaches, people are going to be self-absorbed, money-hungry, self-promoting, stuck-up, profane, contemptuous of parents, crude, coarse, dog-eat-dog, unbending, slanderers, impulsively wild, savage, cynical, treacherous, ruthless, bloated windbags, addicted to lust, and allergic to God. They’ll make a show of religion, but behind the scenes they’re animals. Stay clear of these people,” (The Message).

Wow! Those words are prophetic.  We ARE living in days where people are indeed lovers of themselves.  Many people are “self-absorbed, money-hungry, self-promoting, stuck-up, profane, contemptuous of parents, crude, coarse, dog-eat-dog, unbending, slanderers, impulsively wild, savage, cynical, treacherous, ruthless, bloated windbags, addicted to lust, and allergic to God.”  I wouldn’t be surprised if there were more people allergic to God than to penicillin.  In fact, just the mention of God on the airways seem to send some people into anaphylactic shock.  Some of you reading this blog might even be turned off merely because the content is about God.  We are living in a culture where many have built up a disdain for God and the things of God.  Even many “believers” has succumbed to the customs of the world.  Many of us are self-absorbed, money-hungry and cynical.  When confronted with the state of affairs of the world, there are Christians who respond with “it is what it is,” “people are who they are,” and “what can we do to change it?”  We have become cynical about whether God’s good can triumph over bad.  Many of us have embraced injustice as the new normal.  I am here to tell you that such thinking is contrary to the word of God.  2 Timothy 3:14-17 says,

14 But you must remain faithful to the things you have been taught. You know they are true, for you know you can trust those who taught you. 15 You have been taught the Holy Scriptures from childhood, and they have given you the wisdom to receive the salvation that comes by trusting in Christ Jesus. 16 All Scripture is inspired by God and is useful to teach us what is true and to make us realize what is wrong in our lives. It corrects us when we are wrong and teaches us to do what is right. 17 God uses it to prepare and equip his people to do every good work, (NLT).

Yes, in order to receive victory against all forms of evil in today’s world, we must remain faithful.  We must trust that the Holy Spirit will give us the wisdom, courage and strength we need.  We should not accept or succumb to the practices of the world.  One person CAN make a difference.  If we would realize and understand that while we might not be able to directly change the people around us, we can change ourselves.  When we begin with a change in ourselves, that very change can and will inspire others to take a stand, which could cause us to see a marked difference in the world around us.  We don’t have to just accept things the way they are.  We can make a difference!  Sometimes, we have to simply decide who we will be.  #Integrity!

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Tonight, I had an interesting conversation with a friend of mine. We discussed the topic of pride, a simple, yet powerful word.
Pride is one of those things that sneaks up on us. Because it takes on so many faces, it is often difficult to recognize.  Tonight, I don’t want to get into a long, lengthy discussion on pride, but I do want to share two points that God laid on my heart.
The first revelation was, when God said that every knee shall bow and every tongue shall confess that Jesus Christ is Lord (Philippians 2:9-10), He did not exclude the Christians. There is a tendency for us as Christians to think that the verse is applied solely in the context of salvation. Yet, we fail to apply it to our daily walk. Some of us, mistakenly believe that all we have to do is profess Christ’s Lordship. Such thinking is so far from the truth.  It is not enough to simply confessing that Jesus Christ is Lord of lords and King of kings. We also have to bow our knees. This require humility.  Part of this humility is realizing that we were made by God and for HIS purpose. It’s just that simple. While He does grant the desires of our hearts, our existence is not about making our flesh comfortable. It’s about serving Him. I think the problem with a lot of us, Christians and non-Christians alike, is that we miss one crucial fact. We BELONG to God. He OWNS us. We are His POSSESSIONS. We are HIS.  The truth is, if He wanted us to bark at the moon from now until the end of time, He would be perfectly within His right. Again, we BELONG to Him. We should know that even though His graciousness and mercy won’t allow Him to do so, He still has that right. Sometimes, our desire for self-expression and autonomy usurps that knowledge.
My second revelation is this: We should be cognizant of the fact that our insecurity and need for validation can sometimes precipitate our pride. When you and I become people pleasers, we place ourselves in positions where we constantly need to be validated by others. Here is where pride comes it. When we ask others to stroke our egos, we can sometimes get caught up in our own hype. I am not saying that we should not embrace the occasional compliment. I am simply saying that constantly seeking approval could be fertile ground for pride.
That’s it. That was my thought for the night.
Sidebar:
Two more weeks until Christmas!!! Tonight I want to say that I am most grateful for grace.

EnvyA few weeks ago, we started a new series called the seven deadly sins.  Those sins are:  pride, envy, greed, wrath, gluttony, sloth and lust.  In our previous discussions, we mentioned that although the concept of the seven deadly sins is not Biblical per se, some scholars have said that the principle has a Biblical derivative, specifically Proverbs 6:16-19 and Galatians 5:19-21:

16 There are six things the Lord hates,
seven that are detestable to him:
17  haughty eyes,
a lying tongue,
hands that shed innocent blood,
18   a heart that devises wicked schemes,
feet that are quick to rush into evil,
19     a false witness who pours out lies
and a person who stirs up conflict in the community, (Proverbs 6:16-19, NIV).

19 The acts of the flesh are obvious: sexual immorality, impurity and debauchery; 20 idolatry and witchcraft; hatred, discord, jealousy, fits of rage, selfish ambition, dissensions, factions 21 and envy; drunkenness, orgies, and the like. I warn you, as I did before, that those who live like this will not inherit the kingdom of God (Galatians 5:19:21, NIV).

So far, we have talked about pride and greed.  Today we will talk about envy!

Previously, we mentioned that pride was the original sin that caused man to fall.  If I were to rank the seven deadly sins in order of egregiousness, I would say that pride would be a first place contender, and envy would be a close runner up.  Of the seven deadly sins, I believe that these two are the most vile of them all.  I would even argue that pride and envy are what I would call gateway sins.  When they take root in our lives, they open the gates for other sins.  Let’s take a look at James 4:1-4 to illustrate this point.

What causes fights and quarrels among you? Don’t they come from your desires that battle within you? You desire but do not have, so you kill. You covet but you cannot get what you want, so you quarrel and fight. You do not have because you do not ask God. When you ask, you do not receive, because you ask with wrong motives, that you may spend what you get on your pleasures.

You adulterous people, don’t you know that friendship with the world means enmity against God? Therefore, anyone who chooses to be a friend of the world becomes an enemy of God. Or do you think Scripture says without reason that he jealously longs for the spirit he has caused to dwell in us? But he gives us more grace. That is why Scripture says:

“God opposes the proud
but shows favor to the humble.”

James 4:1-4, NIV

So, in James 4:1, the Bible says that our desires that battle inside us is what causes us to quarrel and fight.  That is pride and envy 101.  It was pride and envy that caused Adam and Eve to eat from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.  Their pride told them that they were entitled to God’s knowledge.  Their envy made them begrudge the fact that God possessed the knowledge that they thought they deserved.

Now, here is why I call pride and envy the gateway sin.  James 4:2 says, “You desire but do not have, so you kill. You covet but you cannot get what you want, so you quarrel and fight.”  Remember pride makes us feel entitled and envy makes us think we should have the product of our entitlement.  So what happens when someone has what we think we should have? We become envious and that envy could lead to rape, murder, adultery, lying,  greed, and any other vice we could think of.  Let’s look at some practical applications.  For example, a man cheat on his wife with another man’s wife.  Why?  Somehow, deep down inside, he has reasoned that he is entitled to the value that other man’s wife brings to her husband.  The man who is doing the cheating might have reasoned that he deserved to be respected, loved and honored.  Since he is envious of his perception of the other man’s wife’s values, he “steals” her from the other man.  His pride has told him that he is entitled, and his envy has precipitated his adultery, lying and stealing, and in some cases, killing.

Let’s use another example.  A woman shoplifts from a department store.  Why? Somewhere in her mind, she has determined that she is entitled to the items she has stolen.  She is also envious that the store owners/stock holders have move than she does.  Most of the time when we listen to the excuses of people who shoplift, they say things like: “They have enough stuff;” “They’ll never miss this;” or some variation of “I should have this stuff too.”  This is jealousy and pride.  That jealously and pride have caused them to resort to lying and stealing.  First, the individual in our shoplifting scenario has lied to herself in an effort to convince herself that she deserve someone’s miracle/destiny/blessings.  Second, she has lied to herself by trying to convince herself that she is not hurting anyone.  Lastly, she will have to lie to avoid getting caught.

The problem with envy and pride is not that they are inherently bad, even though they are.  The problem is that they set us up for failure each and every time.  It is impossible for us to have someone else’s blessings because that blessing was custom fitted for that individual.  You see, God knows each and every one of us inside out.  Just as no two people have the same fingerprints, no two people have the same spiritual DNA.  When God considered our blessings, He considered our gender, our race, our backgrounds, our personalities, our idiosyncrasies, our level of faith (or lack thereof), our maturity and so much more.  It is IMPOSSIBLE that any another person on the planet would align with us on ALL of those thousands, maybe even millions, of variables.  We could save ourselves a tremendous amount of heartache and pain if we understood that no matter how much we envied someone, we could never have what they have.  Their blessing weren’t made for us.  The other thing is this.  We do not know how much time, effort and prayer someone has put into their blessings.  The problem with many of us is we think that our story ends when God grants us our blessings.  Friends, in many cases, this is just the beginning.  God has an expectation that we will take care of what He has given us.  Let’s use another example.  We might look at our neighbor and say, “Wow, they have such good, accomplished children.  I wish mine were like theirs.”  The problem is we don’t know how they got to that point.  How many days did that mother fast for her children?  How many nights did that father pray for their success?  What about their ancestors?  Imagine how they could have prayed and planted seeds.  They truth is we just never know what people’s true circumstances are.

The final point I would like to bring home is this: James 4: 2-3 says we have not because we ask not.  It also says that sometimes the reason that we do not have is because we ask for the wrong reasons.  Friends, if God owns the cattle on a thousand hills (p.s. He owns the hills too), why aren’t we asking Him for everything.  No matter how small our requests, we should bring them to God.  If we do not get the answer we desire, we should not automatically think that we are asking with wrong motives.  Instead, we should ask God to check our heart and purify our desires.  If we have done a heart check with God and we still find ourselves with the same desire, then the answer is simple.  We have to wait and trust that His timing is perfect.  We have to know that though others might appear to be experiencing their Jordans, their timing is not ours.  We have to trust that God knows what we need and will come through when we need it.

God,

My prayer for today is that you settle the hearts of your people.  Grant us your peace that surpasses all understanding.  Thwart in us any temptation for pride and envy.  Allow us to know that you have custom-fitted blessing designed specifically for each and every single one of us that will be revealed at just the right time.  I pray blessings over all your people.  In Jesus’ name.  Amen!

Pride

Pride is one of the hardest words to define.  Most of us could probably recognize pride when we see it—usually in someone else.  However, we probably couldn’t nail down a precise definition.  Words such as haughty, pompous, arrogance have been used to define pride, but even those words need further definition.  So what is pride? Some might say that pride is where one’s perception of one’s self is greater than reality.  But I am not quite sure about that definition.  That’s very subjective.  Some might reason that a person’s high opinion of themselves is not pride, but confidence.  That confidence might even be valid and warranted.  I am sure none of us, God forbid, would like to be on the operating table of a doctor who didn’t think highly of himself and his skills.  So again, I ask, what is pride?  The best definition that I have been able to come up with is this:

Pride is thinking of one’s self as comparable to God.

The inclination to liken ourselves to God is the definition of pride that God warns us against.  Such behavior is what the Bible says will cause our fall.  In fact, it’s that very same thinking that caused the Fall of man.

Adam and Eve’s sin was far graver than disobedience.  Their greater sin was pride.  Disobedience is simply a manifestation of pride.  Disobedience is our way of asserting that our views or beliefs are better (more accurate).  By eating the apple, Adam and Eve were essentially telling God that He was incorrect when He said that they would die as a result of eating the fruit.  The other act of pride that occurred in the Garden was Adam’s and Eve’s desire to be like God.  In Genesis 3:4-6, the serpent promised Eve that once she ate the fruit, she would be like God.  When she heard this, she did not want to be like God in the way that Jesus has commanded Christians, she wanted to be God.  There is a difference.  When you and I are confident and we acknowledge that we are great through the grace of God, then we become like God.  However, when you and I assert confidence independent of God, we become prideful, and God goes after the proud—after us.     Proverbs 11:2 says, “When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom,” (NIV).  As soon as Adam and Eve ate the apple, they realized that they were naked and they became very ashamed.

God abhors pride so much that he refers to everyone who harbor pride in their heart as an abomination (Proverbs 16:5).  After thinking about the story of Adam and Eve, we could only image why God detests pride.  The entire Earth fell from grace because of a couple’s pride.  If two people’s pride was enough to cause mankind to fall, imagine what our pride could do to the world around us.  In fact, I don’t think we have to imagine.  All we have to do is look around.  Pride has destroyed empires.  It has devastated relationships (e.g. marriages, friendships, families or working partnerships).  Pride has ignited wars and nullified treaties.  Pride has fueled devastation and yielded loneliness.

So now that we know what pride is, how do we know whether we suffer from it?  Easy!  Pride is present in us whenever we have asserted an ability to do something that only God can do.  Galatians 6:3 says, “If anyone thinks he is important when he is nothing, he is fooling himself,” (New Life Version).  We should know that as humans, we can do nothing without Christ first strengthening us (Philippian 4:13).  We are nothing born from dirt (Genesis 2:7) and were molded like clay from the potter’s hands (Isaiah 64:8 and Jeremiah 18:2-6).  All our talent are from God and for His purpose.  Our gifts are to be shared and not to be abused, which include boasting.

Pride is stealth, and it could easily sneak up on us if we are not careful.  The Bible says that the enemy is always on the prowl and constantly looking for someone to devour (1Peter 5:8).  Know that nothing can devour us more quickly than pride.  In the Garden, the snake was looking for an opportunity to whisper in Eve’s ear.  He was able to find her Achilles’ heel.  Thankfully, there is hope.  The Word promises that if we resist the devil, he will flee from us (James 4:7).  We should resist the urge to be God, instead we should embrace opportunities to be like God.  We should also know that those who lift themselves up will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be lifted up, (Matthew 23:12).  With that said, we should be bold and confident in all that we do, but we should also acknowledge where our gifts come from.

When most of us think of our top 10 desired, vacation destinations, we think of cities such as Rome, Paris, Barcelona and Nineveh.

I know what you are thinking.  You are thinking, “Did she really say Nineveh?”

Yes, I did.

Most of you probably couldn’t even spot Nineveh on the map.  Prior to writing this blog, neither could I.

I am not much of a historian, but here is what I do know about Nineveh.  Nineveh was the capital of Ancient Assyria.  It was one of the most powerful cities of its time.  Today, the ruins of Nineveh are located in Mosul, Iran.  What’s left of Nineveh are the shadows of a once prevailing city.

Knowing that, would I still want to go to Nineveh?  Would you?  What if I were to tell you that many of us have probably visited (or will visit) Nineveh at least once in our lifetime?  Hmmm!

Today, my pastor mentioned Nineveh in passing.  He described Biblical Nineveh as a treacherous city plagued by debauchery.  The prophet Nahum described Nineveh as a place of great wickedness.  It was no wonder why when God directed Jonah to travel to Nineveh to prophesize the people’s impending destruction, Jonah ran in the opposite direction.  Imagine how Jonah must have felt when God instructed Him to deliver the gloomy news.  I am sure he asked God, “Why me?”  He must have thought, “Surely, there is someone else more qualified to deliver the report.”  Jonah probably didn’t even care about Nineveh or the people there.  Thankfully, God did.  When it came to the people of Nineveh, God was not interested in sparing Jonah’s feelings.  He was more interested in saving their souls.  You see, when Johan delivered the news to the people of Nineveh, they repented and God relented.  By delivering those individuals, God not only saved them, He saved generations not yet born.  Speaking life into one man’s life also speaks life into his entire bloodline.  You can imagine that those individuals who were spared went on to have children, and their children went on to have their own children, and so on and so forth.

How many of us currently find ourselves in a Jonah situation?  We are doing everything in our power to run away from our assigned Nineveh.  Our “Ninevehs” could very well be our families, our marriages, our relationships or our jobs.  Just like Jonah, God might have assigned us to our current situation to save His people for imminent destruction.  Remember, in the story of Jonah, Jonah’s message of destruction was so horrific that it caused the people to repent.  It could be very possible that God is using us as Jonahs in our personal Nineveh.  Salvation for one could often mean salvation for many.  Remember Abraham?

When Abraham questioned God in the Old Testament about whether He would refrain from destroying Sodom for the sake of the righteous, God said he would (Genesis 18:22-33) not destroy the city if He could find righteous people there.  Maybe our presence in our Ninevehs (or Sodom) could spare the destruction of those around.  As Christians we are called to shine our light wherever we are.  Regardless of wherever we are called to be, God can allow His light to shine through us and reflect His goodness and mercy!  So, the next time we try to escape from our situations, we should determine whether we are trying to escape our Nineveh.  If we are, we might find ourselves in the belly of a whale.

The closing ceremonies for the Hillsong 2013 NY Conference was almost two days ago, and I am still savoring the glory of the experience.  There were so many amazing stories and testimonies shared.  The one that most compelled me was that of Joel Houston.  He is the lead singer of Hillsong United and co-pastor of Hillsong Church NYC.  He testified that his walk with God did not always immunize him from insecurity and loneliness.  Joel, a man of God and a pastor, stood before thousands and shared a part of himself.  The authenticity of his vulnerability was palpable.  It was raw.  How much courage that must have taken?  Surely, he must have considered what other would have thought of him.  What would his flock say?  Would they frown on him as a leader for admitting his fallibility, or would they honor him for his humility?  The answer is both!  The truth is, you could never be everything to everyone, but you could be something to someone.  When you and I are vulnerable, it allows others to embrace their own imperfections.

A lot of my confidence has evolved by experiencing other’s vulnerability.  For example, as a recently graduated dentist, I had the opportunity to work with an amazing Endodontist (Root Canal Specialist).  She had worked previously as a general dentist.  Her vulnerability and transparency gave me courage to face my insecurities.  It took great courage for her to share some of her pitfalls with me.  She stepped out on a limb and trusted that I would not use the information she shared to judge her or scale myself to her.  I have to tell you, her act of kindness boosted my confidence.

When we express vulnerability it allows the recipient to know that they are not alone.  Vulnerability allows others to know that it is possible to be victorious despite their circumstances.

When Joel shared his story, it reminded me that even those closest to God are still refined by fire.  Joel’s testimony not only renewed hope, but it created an opportunity for the development of freedom.  Unfortunately, even Christians are held captive by false ideologies.  The idea that trials are punishment for misdeeds still permeate the Christian world.  That concept is nothing new.  Look at Job.  His friends thought that his misfortune was directly correlated with his sin.  Thankfully, grace is free.  God created it in a way where we can’t earn it.  We can’t buy it, and, we definitely can’t lose it.

Today, my prayer is that you allow others to experience freedom through your vulnerability.  The notion that we always have to have it together is false and dangerous.  It creates fodder for negative spirits (e.g. insecurity, doubt, envy and fear).  Ask God to grant you the vulnerability to set someone free.  In the process, you will learn that the person who will experience the most freedom is YOU!

Moment

“For where two or three gather in my name, there am I with them,” (Matthew 18:20, NIV).

If we were to take Matthew 18:20 literally, we would be inclined to assume that when the author spoke of a gathering, he was simply referring to a natural occurrence—an assembly of people.  We couldn’t be more wrong!  The Bible is filled with double, even triple, entendre.  What if I were to tell you that it is possible for people to gather without meeting?

This weekend, I attended the 2013 Hillsong Conference, which was held at the world-famous Radio City Music Hall in NYC.  Although Hillsong Church, which was founded in Australia, has hosted several conferences in the past, this was their first conference in NYC.  In fact, about three years ago, Hillsong Church set their sights on the Big Apple, and Hillsong NYC was birthed.  As I sat in the audience and listened to the stories of some of the pioneers, I noticed one common denominator.  God had made an impression on each individual’s heart, and each individual followed up with prayer.  Their prayers for NY made me think of my own NY experience several years prior.

Picture this: New York City, Lower East Side (Sorry, I couldn’t resist.  I love Sophia from the Golden Girls.  For those of you who have no idea what I am talking about, you’re missing out).  I digress.

Picture this: New York City, Lower East Side.  I was a young, naïve woman living in the City of Lights—not a very safe place for the young and vulnerable.  Don’t get me wrong.  I love NYC.  It is a great place with golden opportunities.  The “theys” have said that, “If you can make it in NY, you can make it anywhere.”  That is certainly true.  There are a lot of hopes and dreams that have been birthed in the concrete jungles of NY.  However, there is a dark side to NY.  It can be a predatory environment.  The treacherous and the ill-intentioned have also flocked there.  They too are looking for opportunities, but opportunities of a different kind.  They are there to deceive and defraud.  When I moved to NY, I knew I needed to be grounded.  I knew I needed to find a church home.

When I first arrived in NY, I knew no one.  I found my first church through an online search from slim pickings.  Eventually, I found one that was in walking distance from my dorms.  I was excited.  My excitement was short-lived.  Let’s just say that five minutes into the service, I knew that I would NEVER return.  The following week was equally eventful.  My new find was also in the City, but a little further away from my first location.  I guess I should have known something was amiss when the cabbie pulled up in front of the church and asked me whether he should stick around while I scoped out the scene.  Those who are familiar with stereotypical NY City taxi drivers know that offer was unusual.  Typically, they speed off while you still have one foot in the vehicle.  All kidding aside, stubbornness got the best of me.  I told the cab driver to leave, and proceeded inside.

Service was scheduled for 11 o’clock on Sunday morning.  This time, I had taken extra precautions to ensure that I would have a positive experience.  Early Saturday afternoon, I had called the church office to confirm the time and location of the service.  I arrived at the church around 10:45.  To my surprise, there was only one other person there, and he gave me the creeps.  He was a talk, middle-aged man dressed in a black suit and a top hat.  He tried to make small talk, but I couldn’t hear him over the intensity of my heart pounding. Between questions, he would intermittently open and close the door to the entrance of the church.   My pulse raced each time the door closed.  Maybe he was a standup Christian man, or maybe he had stacks of bodies in the church basement.  I didn’t want to stick around long enough to find out.  During one of the open-door intervals, I bolted, and I did not look back.

That was week two.  By the third week, I had grown tired of being disappointed and frustrated.  In my heart I whispered, “If I don’t find a church that I like this week, I will stop looking and just not go.”  Thankfully, we serve a God that responds to silent SOS.

On the third week of my church quest, I found yet another Manhattan church online.  That Sunday morning, I got dressed and headed down the elevator as I had the weeks before.  As I was about to exit the building, I stopped and chatted with my building’s front desk security guard.  He was a Christian, and we had spoken about Christ many times before.  That morning he asked me a question that changed my life.

“Where do you go to church,” He asked.

I smiled and replied, “I don’t know.  That’s what I’m trying to find out.”

When I told him that I was having difficulty finding a church, he suggested that I look up the Brooklyn Tabernacle.  His suggestion resonated with my spirit.  I dashed upstairs before he could place the final period on his sentence—I couldn’t have move fast enough.  That afternoon, I attended the 12 o’clock service at the Brooklyn Tabernacle.  I was fed there for almost five years—the entire time I lived in NY.

This is the point where our story comes full circle.  Although I LOVED the Brooklyn Tabernacle and would never trade my experience, there were weekends where I wished that the City offered more variety for hungry Christians and famished unbelievers.  Oftentimes, I would pray that individuals who had also had difficulties finding a church home would not be discouraged.  I prayed that God would give them a place of worship where they could hear about His Word and His greatness.  Those were some of my prayers.  Who would have thought that somewhere across the globe people that I did not know, would be “GATHERING” together with me in prayer for the same thing.  Though we were separated by space and time, we were still able to gather together in God’s name.

Several years later, God answered the cries of His people.  Due to the gatherings of many faithful people across the world, God responded to the cries of the City.  As a result, newly planted churches such as Hillsong joined previously established NYC churches to create and even bigger movement of God.

The revelation that the term gathering could be interpreted as a “spiritual meeting” is not to minimize or discredit the importance of intimate, personal fellowship and prayer, for the Bible does say that we should not forsake the assembly of believers (Hebrews 10:25). However, the antidote simply serves to illustrate that our God is not impeded by our limitations (e.g. time or space).

Today, please know that you are not the only one praying for your situation.  Others are, or have been, gathering, whether personally or spiritually, on your behalf.  Isaiah 55:11 says that God’s Word will not return to Him void.  In other words, your prayers that have been rooted in His promises WILL be answered.  So be of good courage tonight and know that God will do what He said He will do!

“Pride goes before destruction, and haughtiness before a fall,” (Proverbs 16:18).  Pride’s stealthy ambush often goes undetected prior to plummeting face first to the ground.  Hopefully, it is in those aftermath moments that we learn the greatest lessons.

One of the biggest lessons I have learned about pride was fairly recently.  I have learned that pride is the root of fear.  Fear is one of the biggest impediment to growth, and many of us believe that if we could just conquer fear, we would be well on our way to the promise land.  However, today, I would like to make the argument that fear is the manifestation of pride.  Hear me out.

In order to make my point, I’ll use an example.  Let’s say for the sake of argument, there was an opportunity for us to start a business.  One of the main reasons that we might use for not pursuing that opportunity would be the fear of failure.  Unfortunately, that fear of failure does not exist in a vacuum.  Our fear of failure is deeply interwoven into our desire for approval.  What do I mean by this?  Sometimes, we frown upon the thought of failure because we don’t want others to know that we are weak and flawed.  If we fail, we would have to admit to ourselves and others that we are imperfect.  That, my friend, is pride.  Another reasons why we might avoid the potential of failure is that we are concerned about what others would say about our situation.  Again, if one of our main reasons for not wanting to fail is that we are weighted by the opinions of others, then we are being prideful.  Here’s why.  We have placed our desire to please others above our call to be true to ourselves.  When we are not being true to ourselves, we are being something that we are not.  Adopting a persona for the sake of approval is indeed pride—making ourselves larger than we really are.

Besides our fear of failure, what other reasons do we use to avoid pursuing an opportunity?  We might use the excuse that we are not smart (rich, talented, gifted, pretty, etc.) enough.  Again, pride could be at the root.  For every problem, there is a solution.  Sometimes we allow pride, which may manifest as fear of rejection, to prevent us from asking for help.  So what if the people we ask for help tell us no.  So what if they give us a harsh yes.  If so, we should simply dust our shoulders off and move on.  However, many of us do not want to risk being rejected, so we don’t seek help.  We remain frozen in our mediocrity.  That is pride.   

The truth is, there are so many factor that determine why we act the way we do.  However, today, I wanted us to look deeper at our behavior and not simply take our actions at face value.  Sometimes, there is a deeper reason why we act the way we do.  Sometimes it’s pride.