Archives for category: Christmas Miracle

Porridge

 

The story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears is a classic, childhood fairytale.  In summary, Goldilocks stumbles into the house of the three bears.  She sits in their chairs, eats from their bowls of porridge and eventually falls asleep in one of their beds.  When Goldilocks ate from the first bowl of porridge, it was too hot.  The second was too cold, but the final bowl was just right.

 

When we think about the Christmas story, Goldilocks and the Three Bears is probably the last thing that comes to our minds.  Yet, for me, the irony of the correlations between the two stories made me chuckle.  In Luke 1 of the Bible, we read about the story of Zechariah and Elizabeth.  Both were up in age.  Both were descendants of the Aaron the priest.  The Bible said that both were righteous in God’s eyes.   However, in the eyes of man, the were barren and disgraceful, for they were an old, married couple with no children.

 

A few months later, in another town, a young girl named Mary would have a dilemma of her own.  Mary was young, unwedded and pregnant.  According to theologians, at the time of Mary’s pregnancy, she would have been between 12 to 15 years old.  By modern day accounts she was too young.

 

One woman was disqualified because she was too old.  The other was disqualified because she was too young.  The only thing in both of these stories that seemed to be just right was God’s timing.

 

The angel, Gabriel, had informed Zechariah that Elizabeth would give birth to a son.  Six months later, Gabriel gave the same news to Mary.  Two women.  One angel.  Same story.

 

According to ancient prophesy, a Messiah would be born, and he would be preceded by a messenger.   When Gabriel visited Zechariah, Gabriel told Zechariah that Elizabeth would give birth to the messenger, and they should name him John.  Gabriel told Mary that she would give birth to the Messiah, and she should name him Jesus.  Two great women—connected by God’s divine prophesy.

 

When Elizabeth became pregnant she was past child-bearing age.  Some texts hypothesize that Elizabeth was beyond her forties.  Therefore, at the very least, she would have been at least 30 years Mary’s senior.  That becomes a very important fact in God’s divine plan.  God had already preordained Zechariah and Elizabeth to be John the Baptist’s parents.  He has also pre-ordained John the Baptist to be Jesus’ predecessor.  So, here is God’s holy paradox! Had Elizabeth become pregnant in her late teens or early twenties, which would have been customary for women at that time, Mary would not even have been born.  On the contrary, Mary’s youth prevented Elizabeth from being stretched beyond the limits of her faith.  Perhaps, had Mary conceived a few years later, Elizabeth might have lost all hope.  Additionally, Mary would have been married by then, and there would have been no virgin birth.  Two women, one too young and one too old, proved to be just right in God’s plans.

 

1 Corinthians 2:26-29 says, “26Remember, dear brothers and sisters, that few of you were wise in the world’s eyes or powerful or wealthy when God called you. 27Instead, God chose things the world considers foolish in order to shame those who think they are wise. And he chose things that are powerless to shame those who are powerful. 28God chose things despised by the world, things counted as nothing at all, and used them to bring to nothing what the world considers important. 29As a result, no one can ever boast in the presence of God,” (NLT).

 

The world may have disqualified you because of your age, race, gender or financial status.  However, God has a plan for you.  His ways are not our ways and His thoughts are not our thoughts.  Remember, God always has a bigger purpose in mind.

 

Photo credit:

Isaac Andres

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“Talitha koum!”
“Talitha koum!”
“Talitha koum!”
A few days ago, I read a story on the news about a little girl in California who underwent a routine tonsillectomy surgery in a California hospital and is now on life support after profusely hemorrhaging post operatively. The little girl’s name is Jahi. On Friday, December 20,2013, Jahi’s family filed a restraining order against the hospital that would disallow doctors to discontinue Jahi’s life support despite being pronounced brain-dead.
The first time I read the story Jahi, my heart went out to this little girl I did not know. My prayer was that God would bring her back to life. If there were ever a perfect time for a miracle, this would be it. Christmas is always a time of hope and new beginning. That was my original prayer. However, today when I read the updated story, I zoned in on the little girl’s name. Immediately, my thought went to the story in the Bible of Jairus. It was not lost on me that there was a similarity in both the names and the circumstances.
In Mark 5:21-41 (and Luke 8:40-56), the story is told of a man named Jairus who pleaded with Jesus to save his dying 12-year old daughter. However, before Jesus could get to Jarius’ house, a messenger had sent word that Jarius’ daughter had died (Luke 8:49). Jesus instructed Jarius not to fear and told him that his belief would make his daughter well (Luke 8:50).

When Jesus arrived at Jarius’ house, everyone was mourning the loss of the child. Jesus instructed them:

 “Don’t cry; the child is not dead—she is only sleeping,” (Luke 8:52, NLT)!

When Jesus told them that the child was not dead, they laughed at him (Mark 5:40). Despite this, Jesus, his disciples and the girl’s parents went to the room where she laid. Jesus took her hand and he said:

“Talitha koum,” Mark 5:41, NLT)!

Little girl I say to you get up,” (Mark 5:41, NLT).

The truth is, no one knows God’s will. His ways and His thoughts are higher than ours. However, if it is in His will, today, my prayer for 13-year old Jahi is “Talitha koum!” Little girl, get up. I pray that those who are “laughing” (e.g. the doctors, the hospital staff and the naysayers) would be put to shame in the same manner as those who were laughing in the house of Jarius. In Jesus’ name, I stand on the promise of the Word of God.

“Talitha koum!”