Our greatest cry of desperation is most often echoed by our perception of defeat.

Tears full stream; Face soaking wet,
Mind embrace the thought of death.
Angels screaming, “wait, not yet.”
SOS—extreme distress!
This is an emergency signal, not a test.

The lights they fade to a blurry haze,
Symbolizing life’s darkest days.
Hopes and dreams they’ve slowly fade,
Not completely gone, but far away.

Signals of that final cry,
More shouts hello than it screams goodbye.
But before you cleave that final breath,
Just know that Jesus has already conquered death.

36Then Jesus came with them to a place called Gethsemane, and said to His disciples, ‘Sit here while I go over there and pray.’ 37And He took with Him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and began to be grieved and distressed. 38Then He said to them, ‘My soul is deeply grieved, to the point of death; remain here and keep watch with Me.’ 39And He went a little beyond them, and fell on His face and prayed, saying, ‘My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; yet not as I will, but as You will,’ (Matthew 26:36-39, NLT).

38Then He said to them, ‘My soul is deeply grieved, to the point of death; remain here and keep watch with Me,’ (v. 38).

Many times, we read the Bible and we forget that Jesus represents a coalescence of divinity and humanity. He was a 100 percent human and a 100 percent divinity. The Bible says that in his humanity, he was deeply grieved to the point of death. Now we could spend all day arguing theology as to why Jesus was grieving, but the point still remains that Jesus was sorrowful. When I read this passage, my initial interpretation was that Jesus, in the natural, was depressed, maybe even suicidal. Let’s meditate on that. I think too often, in our efforts to avoid being deemed faithless, we avoid entertaining certain thoughts, which might be the very thoughts that we need to engage in order to set our minds free. It is so important for our walk and our growth in Christ to know that Jesus, in that moment, embraced many of our fears. He embraced our sadness, our grief, our rejection, our doubts, and, ultimately, our death. Only when we embrace the knowledge that Jesus actually shared our human experiences can we truly trust him with our lives. If we only see Jesus as a deity who is completely removed from the human experience, then our excuse will always come down to our assertion that God does not know what it is like to be confined by the flesh. I believe in the Garden of Gethsemane, Jesus allowed His humanity to show. However, His humanity was tempered by His divinity. In the Garden, Jesus was able to conquer death because he surrendered to God’s will: “‘My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; yet not as I will, but as You will,’” (v.39).

The moments in the Garden must have been one of Jesus’ darkest hours. He faced many of the same fears that many of us face today. However, the moment that he decided to let God reign supreme was the moment that ultimately set Him free. Today, Jesus sits at the right hand of the Father. For his obedience, God has given Him dominion over all the Earth. Jesus just had to push through His darkest days to get to His greatest promise, which is our deliverance. Today, what is God asking you to push through?

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